History

“Happy White Peoples Independence Day”

Jack Marshall is peeved at Chris Rock over this tweet: Happy white peoples independence day the slaves weren’t free but I’m sure they enjoyed fireworks Jack thinks that’s “Ignorant, racist, divisive, unfair, disrespectful, bitter, dumb, and not funny.” I’ll give him bitter and not terribly funny, but Jack’s seriously overreacting to the rest of it. […]

The Museum on the Moon

Rounding out the day’s triple header of space related topics, I’d like to point you to the post MOON ARTS, PART ONE by Claire L. Evans. I’ve heard many, many little known anecdotes about the American space program, yet both of the stories there had managed to evade my notice until now. (I suppose that […]

September 11

On September 11, 1944 the first US soldiers crossed into Germany. The 80th Infantry Division under Major General Horace L. McBride — part of the Third Army, commanded by George Patton — secured the bridgehead at Dieulouard. Within a few days, the 4th Armored, under John Wood, would cross at the bridgehead.

Lives, Fortunes, Sacred Honor

Other people are doing this, and I think it’s a good idea. Read at least a little of it: IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected […]

In the Bookbag: A Splendid Exchange

I just received a copy of A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World by William J. Bernstein. He’s got a website, and he’s apparently a fan of Windypundit because he comped me a copy of the book. (I guess this blogging thing is finally starting to pay off.) A Splendid Exchange looks like it’s going […]

I’m Old Too

Alex at Stillettos and Sneakers has a list of things that have changed during her lifetime. For this post I’m stealing her list of items and writing my own comments: The Remote Control All that fancy technology just to avoid getting up and walking across the room? It seemed extravagent. Nice to have, but not […]

Death in Chicago

Slate‘s Eric Klinenberg writes about the worst U.S. natural disaster of the 1990’s, at least in terms of the loss of life. It wasn’t the Northridge quake or Hurricane Andrew. It was the heatwave that hit Chicago in July of 1995, killing 739 people. If this doesn’t ring a bell, welcome to flyover country. Klinenberg’s […]

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