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Responding to Tom McKenna on the Frederick Verdict

Virginia prosecutor Tom McKenna and I never seem to agree on anything (except maybe guns) and my previous post in response to a police officer’s complaint about the verdict in the Ryan Frederick case is no exception: A blogging police officer complains of a manslaughter conviction for a dope dealer who killed a police officer […]

A Response to Scott’s Comments on the Frederick Conviction

A police officer named Scott in Hampton Roads has this to say about the Ryan Frederick verdict: Ryan Frederick will forever be known as a cop killer.  He shot and killed Detective Jerrod Shivers in January 2008 while the Chesapeake Police Department was serving a search warrant at his house.  He is a cold blooded […]

About Joel Rosenberg

Joel Rosenberg has been a co-blogger here on Windypundit for a few months, so I think it’s time to give him an “About” page. I asked him if he wanted to write it, but he told me to write it myself. So I did. Actually, the page is not so much about Joel as it […]

Thinking About the Stimulus: Spending

In the two previous posts in my amateur exploration of the stimulus (GDP, and then Recession), I explained what a recession is and what many economists think causes one. Now I’m going to try to explain my understanding of what a solution has to do, and why some people think a stimulus package is a […]

Obama Derangement Syndrome – Part 5

I started to write something about this nonsense, but Rogier van Bakel did a better job of it than I would have.

Shooting, Scanning, Geeking, Modeling

Too busy to write much, but here are a few random shots around the web: Radley Balko has a way with headlines. The whole post is worth reading. When you go through the TSA checkpoints at some airports, body image scanners can now check you for weapons…and see you naked through your clothes. If we […]

Apple’s Knowledge Navigator – 1987

I first saw this technology concept video about 20 years ago at a presentation at the National Center for Supercomputer Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Part of NCSA’s mission was to explore personal computing applications that required supercomputer-level processing at the time, but which would make sense in the future when everyone […]

Manufacturing Guilt in Louisiana

The amazing Radley Balko has just posted a story he uncovered about a couple of forensic experts working on a case for the state of Lousiana who apparently mutiliated a child’s corpse in order to frame a man for murder. Really. There’s video. The images are disturbing.

Unrelated Stories: Photographing Cops

Via Nobody’s Business comes the news that our British cousins have made it illegal to take pictures of cops: From today, anyone taking a photograph of a police officer could be deemed to have committed a criminal offence. That is because of a new law – Section 76 of the Counter Terrorism Act – which […]

The Amherst Stabbing Case

Well, I’m lazy, and don’t want to replow the ground that others have already plowed; I’m more inclined to do a little freelance gleaning at the corners.  And since somebody asked, and I was writing on it anyway . . . So let’s start here, with the reporting on how Jason Vassell stabbed Bowes and […]

Stupidity and Darwin and Liberals and Molotov Mitchell

In another post, I mentioned that I was worried that I might write something that was so bad it wasn’t even wrong. I borrowed that phrase from Steven Pinker (who borrowed it from someone else), and since saying that, I’ve been concerned that people might not understand what I mean. I’m talking about a level […]

Thinking About the Stimulus: Fear Itself

This is the 2nd post of my amateur exploration of the reasoning behind the stimulus bill. I think I do okay writing about microeconomic issues, but this is my first real attempt at discussing macroeconomics. There’s a distinct possibility that some of this is very badly wrong, or worse, so badly written that it’s not […]

Sanity In the Phelps Fiasco?

Strangely, it appears sanity may prevail in the ridiculous investigation into Michael Phelps’ alleged pot smoking by Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott: COLUMBIA, S.C. – A South Carolina sheriff said Monday he was not going to charge swimmer Michael Phelps after a photo of the 14-time gold medalist showed him smoking from a marijuana pipe. […]

Blawg Review #199 Is Up

Blawg Review #199 is up at Mark Bennett’s Defending People and Oh My God the very first link is to one of my posts. I hope I didn’t write anything stupid in there.

Thinking About the Stimulus: GDP

I want to bloviate about the economy and the stimulus a bit, so I’m going to try to explain our current unpleasantness as I understand it. My economic knowledge is purely amateur, so if you think I’m wrong, let me know. (And if you think my explanation is so bad it’s not even wrong, let […]

Handicapping the Phelps Fiasco

Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott is apparently out to get champion swimmer Michael Phelps for smoking pot. After Phelps’s admissions last week, Sheriff Lott arrested eight people as part of his “investigation” into the matter. Now word is coming out about some of the details of those arrests: “He’s sitting there on Saturday, and 12 […]

Nordstrom Backs Down…Maybe

InformationWeek has the story. (Hat tip: Randazza)

The Bullies at Nordstrom

I’ve been a little busy, so I’m late to the party on this one, but Randazza, Popehat, Greenfield, and Bennett (among others) have been piling onto Nordstrom for their attempts to bully a small business. There’s a nice summary of the situation at InformationWeek, but basically the U.S. Patent and Trademark (PTO) office mistakenly approved “Beckon” as […]

Give Jurors a Guide

Once again, I offer another crazy idea for reforming the justice system… A few days ago, Shawn Matlock wrote a Top Ten list of causes of Jury Anxiety which Ken Lammers commented on yesterday. I’ve served on two juries, one civil and one criminal, and both of these lists seemed reasonable, but they tended to miss […]

100 Years of FAIL

The War On Drugs, at least as the federal level, arguable started 100 years ago this week: On February 9, 1909, Congress passed the Opium Exclusion Act, barring the importation of opium for smoking as of April 1.  Thus began a hundred-year crusade that has unleashed unprecedented crime, violence and corruption around the world–a war with […]

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